Map of the World Mini

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Map of the World (10-Minute Mini)

An Easy-to-Use, 10-Minute Geography Play for Elementary and Middle School

Grades 3-6
10 minutes
$14.95 (or get all five Minis for $49.95)

In Stock.

Includes script, teacher's guide, and audio CD. The CD has all the songs recorded twice: first with singing, so you and your students can learn the songs, and then without voices so your students can perform without us singing along.

And if you ever have any trouble or questions, you can contact us at any time for help.

 

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Map of the World Play/CD - $14.95
All Five Mini Plays - $49.95

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Description

Students get a chance to brush up on the key elements of the global map in this mini-musical. Covered in silly scenes and catchy songs are the parts of the map:  the legend, oceans, continents, longitude and latitude (including the Equator, Prime Meridian, Tropic of Cancer, and Tropic of Capricorn).

Key Terms and Concepts

Map of the World 10-Minute Mini refers to and reinforces students’ familiarity with the following aspects of map-reading for all budding cartographers (a word that actually shows up in the show—we’re not afraid of polysyllabics):

  • Different kinds of maps (road, vegetation, topographical, climate, political)
  • Compass rose (four cardinal directions)
  • The key/legend
  • Longitude/Latitude: degrees/minutes/seconds, equator, prime meridian, Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn, Arctic Circle, Antarctic Circle, temperate zones
  • Names of continents, major oceans and seas
Author: Ron Fink (Composer) and John Heath (Script and Lyrics)
© 2011 Bad Wolf Press, LLC

Characters

NARRATOR #1
NARRATOR #2
CAPTAIN BLUEBEARD
LEFTY
BARNACLE BOB
SCURVY SCOTT
SHARK TOOTH
GREASY PIT
LE PAIN
DAPPER DENNY
MIKE MAGGOT
MARK MAGGOT
BAMBI
MCKRACKEN
SQUID BROTHER #1
SQUID BROTHER #2

and a CHORUS composed of all students in the class

Script

This is the first one-third of the script:

NARRATOR 1: Long ago, a band of pirates set sail in search of buried
treasure.

NARRATOR 2: There were not great pirates. In fact, they were terrible
pirates. Their leader, Captain Bluebeard, was a chicken farmer who had
inherited a treasure map from an uncle.

NARRATOR 1: Bluebeard was determined to strike it rich. He didn’t have much
money, so he couldn’t get a fast ship or a fine crew.

NARRATOR 2: It was a disaster. After several months at sea Bluebeard
realized that neither he nor his navigator knew how to read the treasure
map—or any map at all! They were completely lost, so lost that they found
themselves in Kansas.

CHORUS: This is their story.

CAPTAIN BLUEBEARD: It’s MY story—MY chickens, MY boat, MY story.

CHORUS: This is HIS story, HIS chickens, HIS boat, and HIS inability to read
a map.

LEFTY: Captain, where ARE we? I can’t even see the ocean.

BLUEBEARD: It’s this map! I can’t make heads or tails of it.

BARNACLE BOB: You gotta let us help with you that.
SCURVY SCOTT: Yeah. It’s time you trusted the crew—maybe we can figure it
out.

BLUEBEARD: I guess you’re right. I’ve only shared this with the navigator,
and a lot of good HE did with it.

BARNACLE BOB: Maybe it wasn’t a good sign that his nickname was “Wrong-Way
Weston.”

LEFTY: What happened to him, anyway?

SHARK TOOTH: He was staring at the map and turned the wrong direction on
the half-deck.

SCURVY SCOTT: Oh! Was that the splash I heard a few weeks ago?

SHARK TOOTH: And the screams.

BARNACLE BOB: Too bad we don’t know how to turn a ship around.

CHORUS: Chicken farming is a noble occupation.

CAPTAIN BLUEBEARD (looking around to find the voices of the chorus): Who
are these people? Show yourself!

CHORUS: No, you’ll never find us.

BLUEBEARD: Well, that navigator had one of only three copies of my map.
Luckily, I’ve locked the original in my cabin.

LEFTY: Where’s the other one?

BLUEBEARD:I gave it to the cook for safekeeping. Somebody get Greasy Pit.

GREASY PIT (entering): Did I hear my name?

SCURVY SCOTT: Yeah. The captain wants you to bring out the map.

GREASY PIT: That was a map? Are you sure? I put it in last night’s stew.

BARNACLE BOB: I THOUGHT it had a certainly worldly flavor.
BLUEBEARD: You have to stop dumping everything lying around into the stew.
(exits)

SHARK TOOTH: Hey Greasy, you seen my shoes? They didn’t go in the stew, did
they?

GREASY PIT: Nah. I put ’em in the biscuits.

BLUEBEARD (entering, unrolling parchment): Okay. Here it is. My treasure
map. See? Completely confusing.

CHORUS: You’re holding it upside down.

GREASY PIT: And this arrow here? It points north. Some maps have a compass
rose that shows the four cardinal directions.

BLUEBEARD: But this map of the world is all, well, weird looking. Is Canada
really that big? You’d think it would be harder to ignore.

LE PAIN (entering, speaking in a bad French accent): Ah, mon captain, you
are speaking of ze land zat I love.

BARNACLE BOB: Knock off the phony Québécois, Le Pain. You’re from
Vancouver.

LE PAIN: Fine. But it’s true, Captain. Flat maps of the earth have to
project the spherical surface of the earth onto the flat surface.

CHORUS: Something always gets distorted.

LE PAIN: Sure…areas, distance, direction, or shape. This map is a Mercator
projection—the areas towards to poles are unrealistically huge.

SHARK TOOTH: You a big map fan, Le Pain?

LE PAIN: Oh, oui oui!
(OTHERS give him a dirty look.)
I mean, you bet! Road maps, vegetation maps, topography, climate, political
maps—I love ’em all.
GREASY PIT: You’re an odd man, Le Pain.

BLUEBEARD: If you’re such an expert, Le Pain, then what’s this box here on
the map?

LE PAIN: That? That’s the key, or the legend.

DAPPER DENNY (rushing in): Did someone say “legend”? I am a legend. A
legendary pirate on a legendary voyage to find a legendary treasure.

SHARK TOOTH (mumbles): Not again. I TOLD you not to bring an actor.

LE PAIN: Dapper Denny, I was just pointing out the legend on this map.

DAPPER DENNY: THAT is not a legend. I am a legend! I thought I had made
that clear. That is just some little box that shows the scale of the map and
the meaning of symbols—roads, boundaries, rivers, railroads, fire imagery in
the Tempest.

LEFTY: Fire imagery?

DAPPER DENNY: Sorry. That’s a literary symbol. I get carried away.

LE PAIN: I know. It’s all so exciting, isn’t it?

BLUEBEARD: No it’s not. It’s completely perplexing. I miss my chickens.
Chickens are so charmingly transparent.

CHORUS: Chicken are NOT transparent. Opaque, maybe.

BLUEBEARD: And what about all these lines on the map?

LE PAIN: Those are key! Those are longitude and latitude. Imaginary lines
that act as a grid. Here’s a line that runs clear around the middle of the
earth. It’s called the equator, and all the lines of latitude run around
parallel to it.

BLUEBEARD: And what about these lines that run up and down between the
poles?

SHARK TOOTH: Careful, Captain. I don’t think you want to ask about
longitude.
BARNACLE BOB: Yeah, keep your voice down. Don’t let the Maggot twins hear.

BLUEBEARD: But it’s puzzling. Why is this one vertical line so special that
it gets to be called zero degrees? Let’s see, it says here it’s called…
(staring up close at the map)

SCURVY SCOTT: I’m beggin’ you, Captain, don’t say anything more about…

CHORUS: …the Prime Meridian.

MIKE AND MARK MAGGOT (just before the enter): WHO SAID THAT?

CHORUS: Prime Meridian, Prime Meridian, Prime Meridian.

MARK MAGGOT (as THEY storm in): I HATE longitude.

MIKE MAGGOT: It’s so…so…erratic.

LE PAIN: Really, boys, do we have to go into all of this once…

MARK MAGGOT (cutting him off): I mean, at least with latitude each degree
is the same distance everywhere, about 70 miles.

MIKE MAGGOT: But does LONGITUDE care about consistency?

MIKE and MARK MAGGOT: NOOOOoooooo!

SHARK TOOTH: Oh boy.

MARK MAGGOT: The meridians converge at the north and south poles, but
they’re about 70 miles apart at the equator. It’s not right.

CHORUS: If you squint, it kind of makes sense.

MIKE: And don’t get me started on the 180 degrees west being the same as
180 degrees east thing.

MARK: No, it’s worse than that. Go half way around the world eastward and
it’s plus 180 degrees.
MIKE: But go half way around the world westward—to the exact same spot—and
it’s MINUS 180 degrees.

MARK: But the worst, most hideous thing of all?

LE PAIN: The captain’s dog?

BLUEBEARD: You leave Da Plank out of this. Say, where IS he? Greasy Pit,
did you do something with Da Plank?

GREASY PIT: What? Me? I would never put that dog into a stew. Disgusting.

MARK: The WORST thing of all is the …

MARK and CHORUS: Prime Meridian.

MIKE: Talk about disgusting! Why in the world would they put zero degrees
longitude THERE?

Song 1 - Listen now!

MAGGOT TWINS:

Just ask the narrator
I love the equator
Everyone here agrees
CHORUS: Uh huh
It’s right in the middle
So there is no riddle
Why it’s zero degrees.
CHORUS: Nuh uh

MAGGOT TWINS and CHORUS:
My attitude
Towards latitude
Is all smiles and grins
But longitude
Is messed up, dude
Look where it begins…
CHORUS: Tra la la la la la
MAGGOTS: Greenwich, England
CHORUS: Tra la la la la la
MAGGOTS: What’s the deal with that?
CHORUS: Tra la la la la la
MAGGOTS: Greenwich, England
MAGGOTS and CHORUS: Don’t know where it’s at.

The options were open
And we both were hopin’
They’d get it right this time
PART of CHORUS: You bet
Now we shout in tandem
Their choice was so random
Greenwich just isn’t prime!
PART of CHORUS: No sir.

My attitude
Towards latitude
Is all smiles and grins
But longitude
Is messed up, dude
Look where it begins…

CHORUS: Tra la la la la la
MAGGOTS: Greenwich, England
CHORUS: Tra la la la la la
MAGGOTS: What’s the deal with that?
CHORUS: Tra la la la la la
MAGGOTS: Greenwich, England
MAGGOTS and CHORUS: Don’t know where it’s at.

(This concludes the first one-third of the script.)

Sample Songs

Click on the song name to hear samples. Please note that internet song samples have low fidelity and rest assured that the CDs we sell sound much better! (This player requires Flash. If you have any trouble hearing the samples, just contact us for help.)


Full Song List

1. Greenwich, England
2. Antarctica

Common Core and Other National Standards

History/Social Studies

Language Arts

Fine Arts

  • National Music Standards 1, 2, 6, 7, and 8 for K-4th, Standard 1 for 5th-8th
  • National Theater Standards 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 for K-4th, Standards 2 and 6 for 5th-8th
  • National Dance Standards 1 and 2 for K-4th

Vocabulary

navigator
half-deck
safekeeping
Québécois
oui, oui
perplexing
transparent
opaque
erratic
converge
Holy See
C-Span
See’s Candy
poop deck
esprit
consistency
nematodes
ennui
maggots

Phrases

strike it rich
make heads or tails of it
fire imagery
literary symbol
in tandem